Lesson 5 – Language at home

Let’s look at some useful Yankunytjatjara words and sentences that get used commonly around the home and the camp.

Using language around the home and amongst everyday life is a great way to move your language skills from the learning phase to the practising stage. The use of language in the home and the camp will help build confidence in your ability to use language with common day to day speaking.

Here are some words to learn for around the home and camp:

IN THE MORNING

To get someone out of bed you might say something like Pakala! Pakala means get up!

English
Yankunytjatjara
Get up.
Pakala.

If you wanted to get someone up a bit more quickly you might say Mapalku pakala! Mapalku means quickly or immediately, and pakala means get up.

Get up quickly.
Mapalku pakala.

You might even direct it at too different members of your family. Katja mapalku pakala! Katja means sonmapalku means quickly or immediately and pakala means get up.

Get up quickly son.
Katja mapalku pakala.

Let’s get some other family members up for school quickly.

Kuṯa means older brothermapalku means quickly or immediately and pakala means get up.

Kangkuṟu means older sistermapalku means quickly or immediately and pakala means get up.

Get up quickly older brother.
Kuṯa mapalku pakala.
Get up quickly sister.
Kangkuṟu mapalku pakala.

Finally, Ngayuku means mywaltja means familymapalku means quickly or immediately and pakala means get up..

Get up quickly family.
Ngayuku waltja mapalku pakala.

Now let’s focus a little more around the camp then the home.

Maybe you want to ask someone to chop some firewood, you might say Nyuntu waṟu maṟa? Nyuntu means you, waṟu means firewood and maṟa means to get.

Can you get some firewood?
Nyuntu waṟu maṟa?

Once you collect the firewood you might tell someone to light a fire. You could say Waṟu kalala! Kapi pala ngalya-yananyi! Waṟu means firekalala means light itkapi means water/rainpala means that and ngalya-yananyi means coming.

Light the fire! That rain is coming!
Waṟu kalala! Kapi pala ngalya-yananyi!

You might be a bit hungry so you might want to tell your family you are hungry. You might say Ngayulu anymatjara, ka nyuntu? Ngayulu means I’manymatjara means hungry and nyuntu means you.

I'm hungry. You?
Ngayulu anymatjara, ka nyuntu?

If you’re hungry you could say Ngali maḻu wipu ngalkuṉi. Ngali means us twomaḻu wipu means kangaroo tail and ngalkuṉi means eat.

Us two, eat some kangaroo tail.
Ngali maḻu wipu ngalkuṉi.


After you’ve eaten some food you might ask someone to tell a story. You could say tjitji tjuta-ngka wapar watjala. Tjitji tjuṯa means childrenla kutu means towapar means story and watjala means tell it.

Tell the children a story.
Tjitji tjuṯa la kutu wapar watjala.

While sitting around the fire the smoke might be getting in your eyes. You might say Waṟungku puyutjunanyi. Waṟungku means the fire is and puyutjunanyi means smoking me out.

The fire is smoking me out.
Waṟungku puyutjunanyi.


As it gets later, it might be time for everyone to go to sleep. You might say Ngayulu manta-ngka ngarinyi. Ngayulu means Imanta means ground, the ending -ngka means at and ngarinyi means lying down.

I'm lying down on the ground.
Ngayulu manta-ngka ngarinyi.


Pointing at your Dad you might say Mamanya anku ngarinyi. Mamanya means Dad isanku means asleep and ngarinyi means lying down.

Dad is sleeping.
Mamanya anku ngarinyi.

Let’s recap the different words we’ve learnt.

get up
pakala
quickly
mapalku
family
walytja
old man
tjiḻpi
sister
kangkuṟu
camp
ngura
firewood, fire
waṟu
chop
aṯuṉi
light it
kaḻala
water/rain
kapi
that
pala
coming
ngalya-yananyi
hungry
anymatjara
us two
ngali
kangaroo tail
maḻu wipu
eat
ngalkuṉi
children
tjitji tjuṯa
story
wapar
tell
watjala
smoke
puyu
climb
kaḻpanyi
my/mine
ngayuku
eyes
kuṟu
asleep
anku
that one
palatja
lying down
ngarinyi
ground
manta
I
ngayulu

That’s it for the first five lessons of Yankunytjatjara. We’ll be aedding more over the next few months to help keep the learning going. Remember to keep going back over the material we’ve covered in the first five lessons to keep words and sentences fresh in your memory.

Previous All Lessons